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20131202
20131210
STATION
SFGTV2 16
LANGUAGE
English 16
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
SFGTV2
Dec 3, 2013 12:30am PST
an effort to take the temperature of public defense across the country and i visited a lot of public defenders offices, watched a lot of trials and discovered that there was a crisis in the court's that probably all of you are well aware of and really tried to dig in and find out what was going on and where all these problems were arising that we didn't have equal justice 50 years after gideon. what i would like to do is read a little section of the book first and talk for a few minutes and read a brief section. so, the section i'm going to read is in the conclusion because it's about public defenders in a conference i went to with public defenders since i thought there were probably quite a few of you in the audience, you might find it musing. i don't know. the national defenders association opened the conference in washington dc in 2011 addressed the crowd of 300 public defenders with a room with space for many more. does society demonize you? of course. do they suggest you are working for the wrong people? of course they do do they suggest you are work for thugs? of course the
SFGTV2
Dec 3, 2013 1:00am PST
in california. she became a defense attorney and spent 20 years advocating for it and it finally passed in 1920. how do public defenders contribute to their anonymity. >> i'm not surprised it was a woman. but i think that much like me, the population that is served by public defender lawyers is so invisible without a lot of political power, but you add to that, public defenders, i'm going to grossly generalized, so here i go, as a group, wrap, i think in a zelous representation, they tend to be not as open to the public and media. it's very hard to trust that somebody will represent your story well. i really encourage you to do what karen does which is let people see what you do. trust them to tell the story because they will see it. they see it in this film which every time i see it i think it doesn't go far enough, i didn't show enough, i didn't do it and people are moved by the story of people fighting for people. everybody reacts and responds to that. i think we need more access to your stories. i this i they are the greatest hero stories. the only thing i disagree with karen is my lawyers
SFGTV2
Dec 3, 2013 4:00am PST
. that does not make any difference. the defense has been tried in court. is a civil rights statute. -- it is a civil rights statute. they can be a perfectly legitimate plaintiffs to bring a lawsuit, and there are a number of people who belong to disability organizations that actually, that is what their livelihood is, bringing these lawsuits. the gentleman over here, who was also a lawyer knows of at least one case involving two lawsuits. they started all neighborhoods. the target places like san francisco because this is an old city with old buildings, virtually none of which comply. we only have new construction that would be billed to 1988 compliance standards, usually. whatever kind of business you have, the building part does not enforce ada compliance. you have your architect look at the ada if you are going to make a major revision anyway. is very expensive to do that. the demand letter is a requirment for the state -- is a requirement for the state laws to be brought. for civil rights cases, you are expected to know the law and be in compliance. they do not make a demand un
SFGTV2
Dec 3, 2013 7:30am PST
the changes, but there is no defense to making the changes. even if it is a historical building. that is not a defense. when i get involved, it is because 90% of the time, the tenant is the only one who gets the notice, though the notice is addressed both to the tenant and landlord. next thing you see, you are handed a piece of paper by some stranger, and it is a lawsuit. then you need to find a lawyer. probably 90% of these cases are in federal court. it becomes much more costly to get a lawyer involved. most lawyers charged somewhere between $5,000 or $10,000 to get involved in some of these cases. you need to file a formal answer in the court. you will be in a mediation process, which means you will meet with people appointed by the court to try to resolve this issue. the revolution is just what i said. it is major repairs if they are appropriate, and not all repairs are in demand. and, to settle the damaged portion of the case. in my experience, the damages claimed usually run somewhere between $15,000 or $5,000, and attorneys fees generally run between $10,000 or $15,000. m
SFGTV2
Dec 4, 2013 11:30am PST
the first line of defense, but we need defense in depth and that comes out of having a fair society. >> i think we have time for one more question. >> it better be awesome. no pressure. >> i think it's a good one to end with. you've talked a lot and i've heard other people talk about the constitutionality or the constitution as a backbone for a lot of what's going on. do you see the constitution as it stands as sufficient to take us forward when the world we're going into is so very different from anything that could have possibly been envisioned at the beginning? >> i think the constitution is designed to fail moderately well. it's been amended and reamended many times through its history. i think that the great barrier we face is one that the framers foresaw which is corruption. larry has written a lot recently about what the framers meant by corruption and the idea that congress being beholden to funders is a major source of corruption. i think the problem economists are discussed for a long time is really a problem of the fact that people who benefit from corruption tend to have very
SFGTV2
Dec 1, 2013 10:30pm PST
of funds the human services provides which is nearly $8 million for the defense services for those who need it the most. some of those funds are coming from something we did last year the housing trust fund it was a measure overwhelming passed and to the tune of $1.5 billion in the next thirty years. we are also in the midst of revigil our cities public housing and no more than do we want to be involved in poverty housing that is for isolated context. i've been working with deputy and hud here in washington to get off the treadmill and repair bag logs including elevators and i've asked our city administrator also the director of housing to partner with hud and to rebiological and expand on the model that's the whole sf model. i'll proud of the process towards ending hopefullyness for our veterans. i want to thank you secretary john's and our local hud office veterans administration and for our partnership. since 2011 we've decreased homelessness among conveniences by thirty percent by opening the permanent housing for 75 conveniences with on site services and our two other successful homes
SFGTV2
Dec 3, 2013 12:00am PST
association. the bar association has been our partners in terms of providing defense for poor people. in cases where the public defender is not able to provide representation, those cases are handled by the private bar and they are doing an incredible job. so thank you very much for that. i want to thank jose as a who is a public defender and here to celebrate with us. we are going to start today by showing a brief video explaining the gideon decisions >> take this empty lot. today you would never know it but history was made here. mostly all is gone and so are the people. the principle they left is still standing. it was almost as bad at life. >> it was a constitutional hero, but the cases that come to the court don't come from the winners in society. they come from the losers. clarence gideon was involved in the justice system since he was a kid. he had been getting in trouble. >> trouble seemed to find gideon. literally small change had gone miss ing from this cigarette machine, maybe $5 total. that's the pool hall there on the bottom. some wine, some beer and a few bottles of coca-cola w
SFGTV2
Dec 3, 2013 1:30am PST
the real property laws is in california and what defenses you might have or what arguments you might have, you are faced with a trained lawyer and someone who has been to law school for 3 years, someone whose practiced for some period of time. what we need here to answer your question is a playwright. this is mccobb. this is weird. we are not on anyone's calendar to speak of. that for some of us, that's what makes it fun. >> thank you. jum. [ applause ] we are now going to take audience questions and answers. no cards. so please pass them in so we can ask questions. you'll let me again ask karen, you spent the last year-and-a-half studying and observing how gideon's promise have been broken. what do you think is an obstacle to closing the gap between rich and poor people's justice. what have we learned about the solution? >> well, i think the biggest obstacle to closing this gap is the political desire to do so which is kind of -- i talked about that a little bit in my talk. but i think that, you know, and you can learn this lesson in many ways. i don't know when you go to work, i have t
SFGTV2
Dec 3, 2013 3:00am PST
. and often the dialogue that occurs between a judicial officer and a district attorney and a defense attorney where there is a public defender or private counsel is really a discussion that is based on perhaps the individuals current offense, it maybe based on the individual's history of offending. it's really not a scientific way of having a discussion around safety and around flight risk. often many of the people that are given very high dollar bails are people where the bench is looking where all the intents and purpose there is no real bail that is because this person is a real risky person or perceived to be risky and perhaps a better response to this ought to be if we think this person and property is risky, there should be no bail. conversely if there is a way to evaluate that a person is not a danger to society and because of their evaluation of them that they will show up for court they will be released on their own recognizance. we have a high level of percentage wise of pretrial detentions as opposed to other counties. part of reason for that is because we have a very high level of
SFGTV2
Dec 4, 2013 11:00am PST
't conduct your affairs, even those affairs that are totally legitimate and perfectly defensible and good, then that's great. that's a good outcome, you know. that is, i hope, at least spurring a debate internally there at the nsa. >> i agree. i think you have to go everywhere. >> it's called roots now, right? >> right. >> it used to be deaf con kids, which is hands down the best kids technology program i've ever seen. 20,000 hackers descend on vegas to bump every lock ever made and how air traffic control systems are inherently insecure and so on. and often, a side room all the kids who come with their parents get to hang out and have all of the keynote speakers from the head of the nsa to notorious and awesome hackers come and give them one of 20 workshops on how this stuff works and how to think critically about it. they get lock picking workshops, they learn how to hack devices. your daughter discovered a venerability in apple's ios operating system when she was 9 and disclosed that to apple after a long internal debate about whether or not the kid should use it secret and use it to i
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)